Monday, November 17, 2008

Painting and Collage





Romare Bearden, The Dove, 1964






Read Chapter 12 on Painting in your book. Choose one work of art from the chapter and write a brief reflection.

40 comments:

KelceyB said...

I think collage art is a lot of fun. There is so much you can do and it doesn't require you to be a great artist. All you need is some random materials and maybe some pictures. Creativity plays a big part in making a collage and I believe that deep down we all have a little bit of that.

My favorite artist from this chapter is romare bearden. He is actually the artist ms.hoffman used when posting this weeks blog. His work is easy relate to and at the same time it takes time to gain a full understanding of it. A lot of his work is about equality and his feelings. The piece "The Dove" uses so many different things and it is all compiled to show his feeling, which was about his fitting in.

In his work there are so many mediums and it creates more and more for the viewer to analyze. The mood of his work is all do dull(which could be result of the materials being used. But I do believe it was on purpose). This makes the subjects expression so deep and it makes us want to understand what they are going through.


http://www.albrightknox.org/ArtStart/art/1981_39.jpg



http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p201/freedomsxm/TheArtofRomareBearden.jpg

alblizz said...

The Annunciation, (The Merode Altarpiece)

The Annunciation is a three part panel work of art created by painter Robert Campin between 1425 and 1430. Within the first panel on the left of the painting, a man and a woman are kneeling at the door of Mary and Joseph’s house. It is said that the couple painted were the commissioner’s of this art piece and as a thank you, Campin decided to paint the couple within his work. The second panel portrays the annunciation of Mary, when the archangel sent from heaven describes to Mary God’s intentions of what her future holds. At this time, Mary also became aware that she was pregnant with the son of God. In the third and final panel, Campin painted Saint Joseph working busily at his carpenter duties. What is odd about this three part scene however is that in the scriptures Mary and Joseph married after the annunciation had taken place, and yet Campin chose to paint them already living together. Not only did the artist decide to alter the scene to his own liking, he also filled the painting with numerous religious symbols.
Such symbols include the Old and New Testaments of the bible which lay on the table in the middle panel. The two books portray the realization of the angel’s prophecy. Also, in the middle panel, there is a vase of lilies on the table which represent Mary’s virginity; even the table itself represents a religious symbol with its sixteen sides which stands for the “sixteen main Hebrew prophets.” Furthermore, within the third panel it appears that Joseph is creating a mouse trap symbolizing how Jesus is later used as a bait to capture Satan.

Alix Blizzard

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9rode_Altarpiece

Tiffany Mercado said...

I really like the work of art by Fra Andrea Pozzo, The Glorification of Saint Ignatius, 1691-1694.
I think the most remarkable element about it is that it's painted on the ceiling of the Sant'Ignazio church in Rome. When looking up at the work it feels as if you are looking into the heavens. Saint Ignatius is from the Jesuit order and created during the counter-reformation in Baroque-style. Pozzo was so clever at the use of perspective that he wrote a moving composition. He placed a disk in the nave floor to mark the exact spot to view the entire piece of art and create the illusion. When viewing this art it's busy but calming at the same time.

crystal said...

I really like Fra Andrea Pozzo's, The Glorification of Saint Ignazio, Rome. This painting is beautiful. It tells a story of Saint Ignatius being transported on a cloud toward the waiting Christ. The attention to detail is exquisite.There is so much for the eye too see. The colors and medium chosen for this painting are simple and yet perfect and almost realistic.

David Amador said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
David Amador said...

The Dove 1964.

The Dove collage is among twenty-one works that Bearden made during his involvement with the spiral, an organization of fifteen African American artist formed in July 1963a month before the march on Washington DC led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The Dove symbolized the attitude of a group, which answered the question of “what is black art?”
Personally I believe that this piece of art is a good representation of our culture and origin. As an artist and also a musician, Bearden captured very well the essence of a multi- cultural neighborhood in the street of New York, Harlem.

Making collage art looks fun and easy, but imagination has to be put at work. Having all the pieces together it is what makes art.

http://z.about.com/d/arthistory/1/0/S/g/pa_neh_34.jpg

alliekw said...

Allison Wasylkiw

The artist and painting I chose from chapter 12 is "Cuauhtemoc against the Myth" by David Alfaro Siqueiros. This painting tells the story "of the Aztec hero who shattered the myth of the conquering Spanish army's invulnerability to attack". I chose this painting, not for the story, for the imagry and strength of the image. The use of color could inspire others to attempt the same beauty. Their is a great use of light against the figures in the painting; especially the figure with the hooves of a horse and also the figure on the right. There is a strong sense of masculinity aswell.

lkm1991 said...

I was especially drawn to the Andrew Wyeth painting, "Braids," because of the extraordinary detail of the artist in painting with such perfection and realism the finite strands of hair that have escaped the confined space of Helga's braids. Even I was impressed by the reflection of light on the tiny single thread of hair, which proclaimed to me a feeling of significance in even the most inconsequential single hair often muted or rendered insignificant when it is combed efficiently into the whole body of an abundant and luxurious head of hair. From this "naturalness" the viewer is drawn to the features of the face which suggest a pensive and calm demeanor, serious and contemplative. The whole aura is comforting to me because I see sturdiness and sureness in its simplicity. I was so drawn to the picture that I looked up other works by Andrew Wyeth, like the "Long Limb" which Wyeth painted around 1999. I read Hoving's article about his friend Andrew Wyeth and was touched by Wyeth explaining that the patch of snow in the "Long Limb"painting was his grave and the wilted but clinging leaves on the long limb above the patch represented friends who had passed away. I can view Wyeth's paintings which are largely of rural landscapes, and identify with the soulful representation of nature and divinity and activity and intenseness imbued in the detail, if one only thinks and imagines and relates. I am intrigued that Wyeth mixed four ounces of pure gold into awash applied to the painting,"Long Branch." Wyeth consistently uses egg tempora for his paintings with a talented proficiency that seems to lend itself to the special and minute detail characteristic of his paintings. I also read an excerpt by some art critic named Brian O'Doherty that I thought was dimishing of Wyeth's work and I did not like it. He seemed to suggest that Wyeth was an imitator and had no depth as an artist. Some art critic!

"Andrew Wyeth at 82." Artnet.Com Magazine Features. 21 Nov 2008
http://www.artnet.com/Magazine/features/hoving/hoving5-18-00.asp

"Andrew Wwyeth's Helga Pictures: An Intimate Study." 21 Nov 2008
http:/www.tfaoi.com/aa/311/311244.htm

Joseph Mercado said...

Romare Bearden, The Dove, 1964 is an extraordinary piece of art. The collage seems to piece together the different characters and personalities in an African American neighborhood of the 1960s. There is a community of people in the collage, but if you look at each individual face each person is looking away and not directly at another in the picture as if to show inner pain or self reflection. This piece was made at the height of the civil rights movement, which was an embarrasing time of history for America. The racism at that time was without merit and continues to be a deep wound for Americans to this day.

It looks as if each person is contemplating their place in that community. The collage is cut out from different sources but still creates one community. The dove looking down on the crowd can represent the Holy Spirit in the Christian religion. The dove is looking over and protecting this community as they find their place in the world.

At that time and place in the civil rights era, it could be quite possible that non violent demonstrations and self reflection of each individuals place and part in the community, were necessary to combat the evils of racism.

Romare Bearden does a great job of portraying that era in this collage, where the collage represents that people come from different sources (race, religion, gender, etc.) but are placed together to make a community which represented in his artwork The Dove. But, that is my opinion of this great work.

bryant said...

My favorite piece of artwork in Chapter 12 is the fresco painting The Glorification of Saint Ignatius by Fra Andrea Pozzo. Fra Andrea Pozzo's painting is located in the ceiling of the church of San't Ignazio in Rome, Italy. I love this painting because is one of the best examples of perspective and reality. It is designed following the arquitectural form of the building upwards vizualizing the church without a ceiling. It illustrates the glories of Heaven and The Christ, showing that God is waiting for us above the Sky . The objects and people on the sides of the painting look clear and large, but going towards the center they are vanishing and becoming smaller, giving the perfect perspective of an illusion. The Glorification of Saint Ignatius is demostrating an excellent illusion to encourage you to think that there is more beyond the sky and a life beyond the sky. I like that image because it gives me an idea of how could be the arriving of Christ and people rising upward toward him.
Picture

VeronicaL said...

The Dove by Romare Bearden is basically cut and pasted papers, reproduced photos, pencil, and colored pencil on cardboard. I realized that Romare used many african americans in his artwork. He wanted to demonstrate equality and show some stereotypes of the black race. Collages are a way to express yourself in a way that the viewer will understand. Romare used many different objects in his collages to give you an idea of what he pictured in his head. Bearden's artwork can be categorized mostly as abstract.


http://z.about.com/d/arthistory/1/0/S/g/pa_neh_34.jpg

Tiffany said...

Tiffany Thompson
I have loved to see how versatile oil paintings can be. They have been used in such great diversity to represent both abstract works and "trompe l'oeil" or the deceit of the eye. In chapter 12 of our textbooks, Susan Rothenberg's Biker painting stood out to me. This painting exhibit so much texture. When I look at this painting it appears to me that the bike is actually moving and the water in the puddle is actually splashing at the moment I see it, but in reality it is a frozen moment with no movement. The texture of this painting and the variety of colors and shadows create this illusion.

paul.davis said...

I really liked the Cuauhtémoc. The Cuauhtémoc took power in 1520 as successor of Cuitláhuac and was a nephew of the emperor Moctezuma II, and his young wife was one of Moctezuma's daughters.He ascended to the throne when he was 18 years of age, as his city was being besieged by the Spanish and devastated by an epidemic of smallpox.

Joshua Jinkerson said...

Ruby Dew (Pink Melon Joy)

This piece of artwork is more of an experiment that has been turned into something more. With the artist merely trying to see how different watercolors react to the paper. The only thing that makes this experiment called artwork is that the scientist behind it had a history a painter. Had this been done by a nobody it would have been considered trash.

Afield said...

The most impressive, interesting, and creative collage art in this chapter has to be Airborne Event by Fred Tomaselli. Although the picture does not do it justice, the close up reveals how complex and amzing the piece really is. The fact that the artist used such detail to make this collage is very extrodinary.
In the Wadsworth Athaniem in Hartford Connecticut, there is a piece by this artist using all pills. I do not remember what the pills formed (because it was many years ago I saw it) but it was very large and the pills were placed maticulously.
My favorite part of Airborne Event it the body itself. It is extremly new and creative how the artist used collages of feet to makw the feet, eyes to make eyes, and so on. I would love to see this piece of art with my own eyes, as well as see some other pieces by this artist.

julieth said...

I choice the art work by Robert Rauschenberg called Monogram made from 1955-1959. I really liked this art work because it's so different i would have never taught about placing a 3D object on to a 2D paper or canvas. Although i dont understand to much the consept of that piece of art i do admire the ingenuity of the artist to come up with new things. I know i was only suppose to pick one artist and art work but another art piece i like from this chapter is from fred tomaselli, called Airborne Event, made in 2003 What really got my attention from this pieces was the vibrant colors and although a lot is going on in the piece it seems like it all come together at the end. also looking at the pice on an individual point its so interesting to see how for example one piece of the work is made up off drawings of eyes that make up a bigger picture.

RBarnes said...

The artist and painting I chose from chapter 12 is "Cuauhtemoc against the Myth" by David Alfaro Siqueiros. This painting tells the story "of the Aztec hero who shattered the myth of the conquering Spanish army's invulnerability to attack". I chose this painting, not for the story, for the imagry and strength of the image. The use of color could inspire others to attempt the same beauty. Their is a great use of light against the figures in the painting; especially the figure with the hooves of a horse and also the figure on the right. There is a strong sense of masculinity aswell.

amy:] said...

A Wall by Winslow Homer is not just a scenic watercolor painting as you might think at first glance. It has a much deeper meaning beyond its washed blue skies and wall by the ocean. Its focal point is the giant poinsettia plant in the middle and is also what connects the sky and wall. Resting on the wall is what looks like black shards of broken glass. The glass represents how divided the social world in the Bahamas was at that time. The islands were taken over by tourism and the wealthy which hurt more than helped the local people. The wall represents the barrier between the outside and the beauty within them; even its freedoms which could be represented by the sailboat passing by.

http://www.artinthepicture.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/wall.jpeg

Sammy said...

Romare Bearden, The Dove, 1964

To me this collage shows a sense community, but is contrasted by individuality. Nobody is interacting with each other, in fact nobody is even looking at each other. I feel that the collage was the best way to accomplish this. Think of it as a metaphor, a collage takes images from different places and incorporates them into one work. Our communities work the same way; everyone comes together from different places, with different lives, stories, interests, hopes, and dreams. We are individuals who are part of a bigger picture, a community, a culture. This work of art reflects all of this and more.

I'm really not too sure on what the significance of the dove could be. To me it seems out of place, possibly watching down on everyone, it makes it obvious that it should stand for something.
I read this about doves in art and literature: "Relationship of doves within the flock, as well as with man, inspired images of love. The representation of lovers clearly was a reflection of the monogamous faithfulness of a dove couple that jointly raised their brood. The homing instincts of doves (pigeons) suggested the image that the bird was a harbinger of good tidings — like the dove in the story of the Flood."
--http://www.christusrex.org/www1/ofm/mag/MAen9905.html --

So the dove could mean love, the love that people can show towards each other, or the love they have for their culture. Or the dove could be a harbinger of good tidings, as in "things are going to get better for us."
Thinking of the context of this work, (the 60's and the civil rights movement), the dove may indeed signify both love and good tidings. Think: "With love for each other, we can make it through this, and good things will come."

This work made me think a lot more than I thought it would at first glance, which is a great thing, after all, art is supposed to make us think and question our notions of the world. This is a great work because it does precisely that.

jordan c said...

the oil painting by Gerhard Richter "Betty" looks like it could be a picture taken by a camera. because he painted it from a photo of his daughter. The work symbolizes contemporary art and art-historical education.She is portrayed in the act of viewing, with an air of mysteriousness about her. Richter prefers his works to be ambiguous. I take it that my task her is to select a single work that has provided me particularly deep pleasure in recent years, and propose it as an emblem of contemporary art.


http://i.blog.empas.com/utopiasun/3952688_523x757.jpg

Alexis_Carpenter said...

Airborne Event by Fred Tomaselli

For Fred Tomaselli, gender is a significant theme. Airborne Event depicts a female figure, legs made up largely of flowers, torso a snake wrapping around an iris, head replaced by a pattern of geometric shapes: kaleidoscopically arranged birds, flowers, butterflies, mushrooms, larvae, spiders, and cut-out eyes. I love that Tomaselli used such bright and hypnotizing colors and shapes. An in depth look into the picture really becomes hypnotizing. The figures head almost looks as if it has been mutilated into the many hexagonal forms containing a variety of lips noses and eyes which are surrounded by the mosaics of birds butterflies, mushrooms, flowers, and etc. I really love this piece because it is such an intricate and detailed collage that grabs attention at once.

melmusick said...

Braids by Andre Wyeth was one painting out of his collection called, The Helga Pictures. Wyeth worked with this subject for almost fourteen years in total secracy even unknown to his wife.
The medium used was egg tempora on canvas. Egg Tempora is paint made by binding pigments in an egg medium. Egg yolk dries quickly and adheres firmly. The Technique of tempora painting can be more precise when used with traditional techniques that require the applications of numerous small brush strokes applied ina cross hatching tech.
We can see in this painting that the use of egg tempora was the perfect choice. Using egg tempora allows us to see the small and precise strokes with every strand of hair from her braids and how the hair lies on her forhead like it was stuck. The black back ground allows her face to almost pop out of the picture. Its as if he chose these dark and muted colors for the viewer to only focus on her face and the braids. Nothing else is important.

sgadis said...

Wall, Nassau was painted when Winslow Homer had visited Nassau,Bahamas. It exemplifies peace but also desolation as the turn of the century had no significant outlook on the Bahamian people. Homer captures a great image of a private acess gate dominated by a wall with the open sky and ocean in as the backdrop. the ocean's water changes from a deep aquamarine to a seafoam blue. Homer, a great watercolorist of the 19th century was trained under the guidance of a Boston,lithographist and at the National Academy of Design. He sought to produce rich vigorous portraits of the early Americal life and hence isolated himself from Impressionism. Homer is renowned for his land, sea and wilderness portraits as well as war portraits of Harper's Weekly.

Bobby Allen said...

I really do enjoy the painting by Judith F. Baca called The Great Wall of Los Angeles. I like how it shows a story of how a whole group of people fighting against the building of Dodger Stadium. Instead of showing just one picture it shows how many people in the sorounding revoted against the construction. It shows how the stadium destroys the outter limits. Being a fan of older stadiums and teams staying with their history i gree with the people. I see that Judith Baca is extening this painting to present the present day to show how the stadium has effected the area present day. I like how we are now able to see how it has helped Los Angeles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Wall_of_Los_Angeles


http://www.sparcmurals.org/present/cmt/Division.jpg

Garrett said...

Fred Tomaselli is an American artist best known for his highly detailed paintings on wood panels, combining an array of materials suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin.

Tomaselli's paintings include medicinal herbs, prescription pills and hallucinogenic plants alongside images cut from books and magazines: flowers, birds, butterflies, arms, legs and noses, which are combined into dazzling patterns that spread over the surface of the painting like a beautiful virus or growth.

His work is brightly colored and draws you in with all that going on in it. its freakin sweet.

Katalyn said...

Katalyn O'Brien

“Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada through the Last Weimar Beer Belly Cultural Epoch of Germany” by Hannah Hoch is described as “the aftermath of an accident between a trolley car and a newspaper kiosk.” The extreme detail throughout the collage is absolutely amazing. It was made during the Dada movement in Germany and was on display in a Dada Fair in June of 1920. There are many recognizable images in this piece, Albert Einstein is in the upper left hand corner and Hannah Hoch herself is in the bottom right corner. This collage is very interesting due to the images that she chose to put together to complete this piece of art.

Hoeksey said...

The Glorification of Saint Ignazio by Fra Andrea Pozzo is a beautiful art piece. I really am not a fan of collage art but after I saw this work of art, it really changed my mind. Well at least for this particualar piece. My eyes just roll over the collage and looks feels like it can wander the piece for days. And after a little, the piece has your eyes wander to the same spot each and every time: to heaven. A beautiful collage!
http://webed.vw.vccs.edu/vwbaile/Media/stignaz.jpg
David J. Hoeksema

KatieRoss said...

Pat Passlof painted Dancing Shoes in 1998 on an 80x132 in. oil canvas. it was made with left over paint from another work. the painting is a yellow background with oranged yellow squares scattered about and dark green blocks that look back. she made the painting then named it after she noticed the squares looked like short leaps as though they were shoes dancing. i liked that the artist didnt know what she was creating til after it was done. and i like that i didnt see the shoes at first but with explaination i did.

Starr said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Starr said...

I chose the art piece "Lamentation" (also known as "The Mourning of Christ") by Giotto. Giotto was one of the earliest artists to portray real life emotions in his paintings, such as this one. This painting was done directly on a wall inside the Arena Chapel in Italy. It is a classical religious painting portraying the moment when Christ was brought down off the cross. The main focus of the painting is directed towards the image of Virgin Mary's grieving face leaning over Christ's dead body. The two are surrounded by mourning saints, angels, and other observers. The background scenery intensifies the feeling of pain and death with the bare rocks and dead tree. This painting is very unique to me because it is a picture that is seen often, yet this one in particular by Giotto really catches my attention because of how each person standing has such individuality. I think that it is really quite amazing how he managed to make each character of the painting look so unique.

http://media.photobucket.com/image/lamentation/tanktest/fs_Giotto_Arena_Lamentation.jpg?o=13

-Christina Newhart

Sarah said...

i love "The Libyan" by Michelangelo Buonarroti because of all the vivid details. The color pops off the painting and forces viewers to stare at it, almost trans-like. The Libyan Sibyl's body looks almost like a snake with the way it curls around as she turns to close the book. Buonarroti's sketch drawing of the painting was also discovered and is surprising that it even survived through all these years. It is clear that the artist preferred the masculinity of the male body of the soft tender features of a real woman with the way Sibyl's back is structured.

nyucha said...

I chose the painting "Still Life with Lobster" by Jan de Heem of the Neatherlands. This artwork is an oil painting of the aftermath of an extravagant meal. The painting contains large amounts of exotic fruits, some which are half eaten and others that are ripe with potential. This painting was made in the late 1640's after the Neatherlands freed themselves from Spanish rule. Understanding the background to this painting is the key to understanding the purpose that is expressed. When under the rule of another, luxaries such as a fine meal that is displayed was not a common accurance. But since being freed this great meal was a symbol of how the people of the Neatherlands could and will be free to do what they can. I love this painting because it has a great meaning behind just a lavish meal, and the fact that everyone expresses their freedom in different ways.

FairfaxVickers said...

I was inspired by and enjoyed Fra Andrea Pozzo's, The Glorification of Saint Ignazio, Rome. To me, it is the epitome of perfection and beauty. As it says, it tells the amazing story of Saint Ignatius whom was transported on a cloud to the lord who was awaiting his arrival to the kingdom of heaven. It astounded me how the painting took detail and colors to a whole different level during this time period. Even though the colors are simple and 'everyday', this painting can catch my attention so quickly and I could stare at it for an hour an still find new details that put me in awe. It is extremely amazing in my eyes.

OneShot08 said...

My Favorite Piece In Particular Is The Dove. I Like Colage because within all of the scattered pitures lies a true meaning. in my opionion i beleve it represent freedom. During that period of time so many thing was goingon and the dove represented freedom and release from the segregations of society.

Raullin Oby

Dani said...

Danielle Mallozzi

Sandro Botticelli's Primavera is the one that i will be talking about. I am a big fan of Botticelli's work, especially his painting The Birth of Venus. There is something so beautiful about his work with the greek myths. I love how he incoporates several Gods and Goddess in his paintings and they all represent exactly what they are known for. In Primavera i love how it's like a social gathering for the goddess' and yet there seems to be some evil in the mix as well. To me this piece is a masterpiece and Botticelli's is a magnificant artist.

Darlin said...

I decided to write my reflection on Jacob Lawrence. He work inspires me because in his era African Americans had many hardships to deal with during the American Revolution. When people came to America to build their lives, the Europeans brought Africans here by force to create a better economy for themselves by holding blacks in bondage. Through the progression of the American economy the minorities started to feel that they needed to be treated like equals in the “land of the free.” Jacob Lawrence was of African descent and he too believed in equal civil rights for all. He became interested in art and delivered his messages through paintings that he created throughout the twentieth century. Lawrence was a painter, drawing and mural artist. He created his works throughout a time in America when it was hard for the black man to come up ahead. He went through the depression and the end of the American progressive era; he also witnessed the great migration of African Americans traveling north, the Jazz Age and the Harlem renaissance. He also created many of his works relating to the Civil Rights movements and focused on great leaders such as Harriet Tubman, John Brown and Frederick Douglas. Jacob Lawrence was a witness to so much of American reconstruction and his artwork is rich with ideas that he had a first hand insight on. He sets a style all of his own by using real life images in an abstract way; he uses brilliant colors and creative detail in his paintings. There is a lot of movement in his work with the change of the decades and to me his messages appear very clear unlike some of the other artworks I've seen. I love the fact that he has paved a way for others like himself by being one of the first artists of color to be accepted into the white world of early America.

kwilson said...

Fred Tomaselli began producing mixed-media works in the late 1980s that combines pills (over the counter medicines, prescription pharmaceuticals, and street drugs) leaves (including marijuana leaves), insects, butterflies, and various cutout elements, including floral designs, representation of animals, and body parts. The resulting images constitute for Tomaselli a kind of cartography- he sees them as "maps" describing his place in the world. Airborne Event might well be considered an image of a psychadelic high. Another way to read this painting is as a critique of what has been called "the jewel-like nature of a pill." Tomaselli's work might also be considered an essay on the toxic nature of beauty or "airborne events" such as disease or disaster.

Kristina Wilson

jeremy hubsmith said...

Tomaselli's paintings include medicinal herbs, prescription pills and hallucinogenic plants alongside images cut from books and magazines: flowers, birds, butterflies, arms, legs and noses, which are combined into dazzling patterns that spread over the surface of the painting like a beautiful virus or growth. He uses an explosion of color and combines it with a basis in art history. His style usually involves collage, painting, and/or glazing. He seals the collages in resin after gluing them down and going over them with different varnishes. [1]
“ I want people to get lost in the work. I want to seduce people into it and I want people to escape inside the world of the work. In that way the work is pre-Modernist. I throw all of my obsessions and loves into the work, and I try not to be too embarrassed about any of it. I love nature, I love gardening, I love watching birds, and all of that gets into the work. I just try to be true to who I am and make the work I want to see. I don’t have a radical agenda.[2] ”

Tomaselli sees his paintings and their compendium of data as windows into a surreal, hallucinatory universe. “It is my ultimate aim”, he says, “to seduce and transport the viewer in to space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.” Tomaselli has also incorporated allegorical figures into his work – in Untitled (Expulsion) (2000), for example, he borrows the Adam and Eve figures from Masaccio’s Expulsion from the Garden of Eden (1426-27), and in Field Guides (2003) he creates his own version of the grim reaper. His figures are described anatomically so that their organs and veins are exposed in the manner of a scientific drawing. He writes that his “inquiry into utopia/dystopia – framed by artifice but motivated by the desire for the real – has turned out to be the primary subject of my work”

Brit said...

Looking at Monogram by Robert Rauschenberg gives me insight that art is always evolving, just at this installation is. Sure, it is always the same goat, but every time Rauschenberg rearranged this piece, it deepened the meaning of the dynamic nature of art.

Ronald O. Horne said...

I think unlike other mediums of art, collage can be for anyone. Its a lot of fun and you can get very creative in many ways. there is no actual way to mess up. there is also many ways to create collage also.

I think out of all the artists the one that I love hands down for this chapter is romare bearden. He makes his art easy to relate to his artwork. I like the way he makes his collages especially. The way it looks is interesting, with having some people with bigger cropped heads and the contrast with the red bricks and the grey color scheme of the collage. His style creates a really unique and calm mood of the streets in the collage “the dove.” The collage really shows the closeness of people that live in the community. The characters in the collage just look like there all just hanging out which creates the calm mood.