Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Places of Worship













Read Chapter 19. Choose a place of worship from the Common Era or after. You may use the book as a source or you may explore somewhere else not listed in the book if you are feeling curious. Do some research on a search engine and write a paragraph about that place. Feel free to use descriptive language. You may include links to images if you would like. You may write about the meaning of architecture, art, or symbols from these sites.

66 comments:

Mikey Thomas said...

The Chartres Cathedral, due 50 miles southwest outside of Paris, is one of France's most celebrated churches of Gothic architecture.

The cathedral has three large rose windows: one on the west front with a theme of The Last Judgment, one on the north transept with a theme of the Glorification of the Virgin, and one on the south transept with a theme of the Glorification of Christ.

The Church architecture is built so that it is "flooded with light" as if the heavens shine down on you. It was designed to "elevate the soul" to the realm of God.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartres_Cathedral#Description

-Michael Thomas

shannon blackburn said...

The Chartres Cathedral is 50 miles from Paris in a medieval town.The Cathedral is preserved in it's original design and is a great achievement of architecture.I think it is pretty cool that the almost perfect structure is in the original form.Due to the fire in 1194, the west tower burnt down.There is said to be a relic of the Virgin Mary and was thought to have perished in the fire.The columns are clustered and rise dramatically from the bases to the ceiling.I bet this is really an amazing sight as well as the stained glass windows. There are 150-170 windows that lay throughout the Cathedral. I believe the Cathedral is a breathtaking and gorgeous work of art.

Flor said...

The Mihrab is a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of Mecca and the direction that muslims should be facing during prayer.

It originally had a non-religious meaning and indicated a special room in a house. As of present day, Mihrabs vary in size and are usually decorated and often designed to give the impression of an arched doorway or a passage to Mecca.

The appearance of it made me interested. They are absolutely well defined and make my eyes explode, making me see them as some sort of collage.

Ramona Hill said...

The Masjid Al-Haram or Grand Mosque is located in Mecca,Saudi Arabia also known as the "Holy City". Islamic tradition holds that the Mosque was originally built by angels before mankind was created. From time to time the Mosque has been destroyed and rebuilt. The structure now covers 88.2 acres, and surrounds the Kaaba (the place where Muslims turn during daily prayer). This is considered by Muslims to be the Holiest place on earth, and it is very impressive.

Russell Wadsworth said...

The Reims Cathedral is where the Kings of France where crowned. It also was made on the site where King Clovis was baptized by Saint Remi, the bishop of Reims, in 496 AD. The church was redone after several major area's of it where destroyed by German shell fire during world war 1. The building has two great bells in its south tower, weighing in more than 11 tons! What I find that really is amazing is its detailed statues and statuettes. Among those are Jesus and the baptism of King Clovis with their successors. Also the Stained-glass rose windows that date range from the 13th to 20th century.

Charlene Dodge said...

I decided to research Gothic style cathedrals and found the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Paris to be such an amazing structure. The construction of this magnificent church was started in 1163 and was completed in 1345. The visual details of the exterior of the building are overwhelming, meticulous and even somewhat gory. The statues and stories of some of the carved scenes depicting death on the walls and the eerie-looking gargoyles might make one uneasy, but somehow the themes manage to flow very well throughout the whole structure. The building is mainly grey in color with the exception of its brown wooden doors and stained glass rose windows that resemble images from a kaleidoscope. Depending on which angle the structure is viewed from, some of the outer extremities lining the roof and steeples consist of lace-like patterns of crosses while others resemble fancy banisters. On the inside, there are a series of enormous marble pillars supporting high archways leading up to the altar. In between each of the pillars, enormous two-tiered metal chandeliers are mounted. There are also vaulted ceilings with smooth, thick lines that connect in the center of each rise that almost appears as icing on a cake. The floor has a black and white checkerboard pattern that is lined with wooden chairs for prayer service.

The main question that I asked myself while viewing pictures of the cathedral is why would a holy place of worship have evil-eyed gargoyles peering down at the public from above? I later found out that these creatures were actually just used as water drains.

http://www.search.com/reference/Notre_Dame_de_Paris
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/france/paris/notredame/notredame.html
http://www.newyorkcarver.com/photogal10.htm

shineon_crazydiamond said...

Thailand is rich in Buddhist culture and tradition, which is probably why the country posseses one of the most sacred temples in Asia.

Wat Phra Kaew (The Temple of the Emerald Buddha) is located in the historic district of Bangkok and in the grounds of the Grand Palace. Unlike other temples, it was not built to house monks but to celebrate the deity of Buddha; consequently it is one of the most ornatly and lavishly decorated temples is Asia as well.

The Buddha inside is small in comparison to other Buddhas being only 26 inches tall. It is in fact made of jade and not emerald and the alter that is is placed on made of solid gold.

The temple is over 250 years old.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_the_Emerald_Buddha

http://www.camino10.com/Thailand.htm

jlytle said...

The Cologne Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of cologne.The cathedral is under the admin. of the Roman Catholic Church but is viewed as a monument for christianity and as a symbol of Greek architecture.The monument is dedicated to Saint Peter and The Virgin Mary.The cathedrial is the largest gothic church in Northern Europe and for four years it was the tallest structure in the world, until the Washington monument was built in 1884.Construction of the church began in 1248 and took, with interruptions, until 1880 to complete, a period of over six hundred years. It is 144.5 metres long, 86.5 m wide and its two towers are 157 m tall.

clalexa said...

BYZANTINE ART

I will like to describe some of the details of The San Vitale church cause of its beauty and complexity.
THE SAN VITALE CHURCH: The most important church of that time is San Vitale, built in 526-547, is of a type derived mainly from Constantinople, We recognize its octagonal plan, with the domed central core as a descendant of the mausoleum of Sta. Constanza in Rome but the intervening development seems to have taken place in the East, where domed churches of various kinds had been built during the previous century. Compared to Sta. Constanza, St Vitale is both larger in scale and very much richer in its spatial effect; below the clerestory, the nave wall turns into a series of semicircular niches that penetrate into the aisle and thus link it to the nave in a new and intricate way.

The San Vitale church has larger windows on every level, which flood the interior with light, famous mosaics flanking the altar just so much beauty to bear. I enjoyed reading about the details of this church and the labored components and history behind it… (Claribel Jimenez)

Aviree Jordan said...

The Reims Cathedral it just absolutely beautiful. The book sayd that it has a Gothic style, which is very true. It has this heavy, thick kind of look to it which in my mind is Gothic. If you look closely you see all these figures. The book says that by the way they are placed and how natual they are standing that this cathedral is more naturalistic. Also you will notice that every figure differs in some way, which might lead you yto assume that they are actual people at some point. At the bottom you have the Reims portal, which hints that it might be a narrative scene.

Heretic with Hot Dogs said...

How many of you realize that if it weren't for England's taxes on the colonies of America, most of us would drink tea instead of coffee, predominantly? Well guess what, that has nothing to do with this. Almost nothing.
During the Momoyama period (1573-1615) in Japan, the tea ceremony took on an increasingly important role. The ceremony can be held almost anywhere, but there is a traditional setting for every ritual.
I've chosen to feature a Taian teahouse from the Myokian Temple in Kyoto, Japan (ca. 1582). This particular tea house was designed by the venerated tea master Sen no Rikyu. Rikyu insisted that there was no such thing as a rank in a teashouse, which he communicated with the way you had to enter - crawling in on your hands and knees (due to the size of the door). Such an entry is intended to foster humility and humble the patrons.
"The Japanese tea ceremony involves the ritual preparation, serving, and drinking of green tea...Simple forms of the tea ceremony started in Japan in Zen temples as a symbolic withdrawal from the ordinary world to cultivate the mind and spirit."
Everything in the tea room is undersized, making one very conscious of their size, motions and actions. It is a time of pure consideration.
"The room's dimness and tiny size (about six square feet) produce a cavelike feel and encourage intimacy among the tea host and guests.
Over time the tea ceremony became embedded in both the cultural and political aspects of Japan, and even played a role in introducing democracy.

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/ealac/V3613/taian/yn75i00.jpg

J Ruff said...

Wat Phnom is a beautiful place of worship for Buddhists. It was built in 1373 in Cambodia. It has been built on an artificial hill because in the past there wasa large flood that washed away ststues of Buddha downstream and they do not want such a thing happening again to their domain. Wat Phnom is the center of city celebration for the Cambodian New Year.

Andrew Gibbs said...

Byodo-in was built in 998 of the Heian period in Uji, Japan. It was at first a village, but in 1052 it was reformed into a Buddhist temple. The only original building left standing is the Phonenix Hall that was built in 1053. Inside the temple is the Lotus Buddha, which is the largest wooden Buddha in existence. Surrrounding the temple is a 2 acre pond, some very traditional Japanese gardens, and The Meditation House which is a place for meditation and inner peace.

momgoinnuts64 said...

The Dura-Europos Synagogue was built in the 3rd century on the Euphrates River in Dura which we now know to be Syria. What made this such an interesting building was that it had multiple uses, which weren't always religious. This was a very ordinary looking building which was actually a house that they renovated. It was rectangular in shape with a flat roof and it shared a wall with a Christian group. It was very unusual for a Jewish religious group to share space at all, especially with Christians. The fact that Dura-Europos was built in a poor section of town in a building with a shared wall by Christians implies they themselves had little financial means. The lack-luster appearance allowed the worshippers to supply Roman soldiers with weapons while staying under the radar during war-time. It also made it possible for them to practice their religion without being persecuted for their monotheistic beliefs which were not part of the Roman ideal. Christians used similar ideas when they were constructing houses of worship during a time when they were being persecuted for their beliefs by the Romans. It was the discovery of this synagogue in 1932 that allowed us to learn so much more about Jewish religion back in the early Common Era.

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/syria/dura-europos-pictures/index.htm

Briana Gamel said...

The Mahabodhi Temple (Literally meaning: "Great Awakening Temple") is a Buddhist temple in Bodh Gaya,in the Indian state of Bihar. It is the location where Siddhārtha Gautama--a spiritual teacher in the Indian subcontinent who is generally seen by buddhists as the supreme Buddha of our age--attained enlightenment. On the temple's western side in the holy Bodhi tree. It is constructed of brick and is one of the oldest brick structures to have survived in eastern India. It is considered a fine example of Indian brickwork, and was highly influential in the development of later architectural traditions. The older railings that support two of the temple's four sides have scenes such as the hindu goddess of wealth being bathed by elephants, and the Hindu sun god riding a chariot drawn by horses.The newer railings have figures of reliquary shrines and eagles. Images of lotus flowers also appear frequently. Under the terms of the Bodh Gaya Temple Act of 1949, the state government makes itself responsible for the protection, management, and monitoring of temple and its properties. The Act also has provisions for a Temple Management Committee, and an advisory board.Mahabodhi Temple's central tower rises to 55 meters, and were heavily renovated in the 19th century.

http://cache.virtualtourist.com/3588475-Mahabodhi_Temple-Bodh_Gaya.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Mahabodhi.jpg/220px-Mahabodhi.jpg

alan nelson said...

The Cologne Cathedral was built on a 4th century Roman temple site. The stone foundation was laid on August 15, 1248, by Archbishop Konrad von Hochstaden, and the choir was consecrated in 1322. Work eventually came to a standstill in 1560. The towers and other parts of the cathedral were added in 1824 with the help of surviving medevil plans and drawings. Completion finally took place in 1880, 632 years after the first foundation stone was set.

Dedicated to the saints Peter and Mary, the cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne.

Inside of the cathedral, the most celebrated work of art in the catherdral is the Sarcophagus of the Magi, dating back to around 1200. Contained in the sarcophagus, there are three golden-crowned skulls, believed to belong to the Magi.

Dawid said...

In chapter 19 the Santa Costanza, Rome C. 354 C.E.. For example happens to be very important art coinciding with the future of Christian religious architecture. Santa Costanza is a mausoleum built circa tomb for Constantine's daughter,Constania. The building defines the points of the traditional Greek cross, which has four equal arms. Santa Costanza circular form is often seen in later Byzantine architecture

Denada Tereziu said...

The Cologne Cathedral located in Germany is renowned as a monument of Christianity, of Gothic Architecture and of the faith of the people in the city, it is dedictaed to Saint Peter and the Virgin Mary. Cologne Cathedral is one of the world's largest churches, known as the largest church in Northern Europe, and is one of the best-known architectural monuments in Germany. It took over 600 years to complete the Gothic church, construction began in 1248 and took until 1880 to complete. It is 144.5 metres long, 86.5 m wide and its two towers are 157 m tall. The Cologne Cathedral is known as a masterpiece.

Jamie Blitch said...

The exact date of the creation of the Deesis Mosaic of Christ is unknown but believed to be from the 12th to mid 13th centuries. This mosaic was discovered on a wall behind plaster and in 1933 the Byzantine Institute of America started chipping away the plaster to discover the piece of art. I took 4 years to chip the plaster off the wall and see the mosaic underneath.
I thought that it was one small mosaic of Christ but I found out it is a whole wall with Mary to the right of Jesus Christ and St. John the Baptist to the left. At first glance the mosaic didn’t really peak my interest however, after seeing the whole wall on the internet I can really see the detail. It’s obvious that the artist dedicated much time and hard work in creating this wall.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/hagia-sophia-photos/deesis-mosaic2-cc-imurdock.jpg.html
http://www.pallasweb.com/deesis/

Angie said...

The Florence Cathedral is a beautiful structure that produces a sense of tranaquillity and calmness. I think it is a beautiful Cathedral, but I was suprised to see that it was placed under the Gothic section. It does not appear very gothic to me, but hey what do I know... anyway, I simply picked this one because I thought it was pretty. I unfortunately did not have time to research more about this one yet, but hopefully I can find time in the near future to do so. The book doesnt have much to say about it, so I don't know much. I see that it says that the inside is much more gothic, but the book does not show a picture of it. Like I said I'll have to find time to try and find it on the internet. Sorry I dont know anymore :(

brad said...

I was really drawn to the picture of the Byodoin Temple in Uji. It looks very peaceful sitting on the water with the mountains in the background. It didn't start out as a Buddhist temple though. It was originally a villa built by Fujiwara no Michinaga in 998 and was converted to a temple in 1052 by Fujiwara no Yorimichi. The temple at one time consisted of several buildings, but the only original one standing today is the Phoenix Hall. The others were destroyed by fire during the civil war in 1336. The Phoenix Hall, or Hoohdo, gets it's name from the phoenix sculptures on the roof (called hoo) and the general shape of the building which resembles a phoenix.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byōdō-in
http://www.kiis.or.jp/kansaida/uji/uji01-e.html

Steven Heid said...

Construction of the Cologne Citadel first began in the 13th century and was finally finished in the 19th century. Although construction began very rapidly, work soon came to a halt. By the mid 16th century only the torso had been built. In the 19th century, romantic enthusiasm for the middle ages pushed toward the completion.

During WWII the Citadel suffered 14 hits from areal bombs but did not collapse. Reconstruction was completed in 1956.

Inside, the most recognized work of art is the Sarcophagus of the Magi. It is seven feet of gilded silver and jewels. Inside, the reliquary holds three golden-crowned skulls believed to belong to the Three Magi.

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/germany/cologne-cathedral.htm

Micah Olson said...

The Byodo-in temple is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in the prefecture of Kyoto, Japan. It was built in 998 in the Heinan Period as a rural villa of Fujiwara no Michinaga, who is known to be one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. It was changed into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in this temple is the Phoenix Hall, or the Amida Hall, which was constructed in 1053. The only remaining original building now is the Phoenix Hall, which is now surrounded by a scenic pond. Additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war that happened in 1336.

Tiffany Fancher said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tiffany Fancher said...

The Florence Cathedral was built in the Florence, Italy. It was designed and built by the master archetect Filippo Brunelleschi. The construction of the dome marks the beginning of Renaissance architecture and according to the original design, techniquely the dome was never finished. The outer shell of the dome couldn't hold the wieght of a design feature... so Brunelleschi cut it out of the design. The outside of the entire cathedral is covered in sculptures and biblical scenes for obvious reasons. It was influenced by some French Gothic elements however, it remained florentine. Inside, the cathedral houses a few famous/timeless masterpieces.

Paintings: The Sistine Chapel and The Last Judgement by Michelangelo

Stained Glass: Christ crowning Mary as Queen by Gaddo Gaddi

Sculpture: Busts of Giotto, Brunelleschi, and Finico.

Personally, I am fascinated with with the outside of the cathedral. Different parts were commissioned by many different artists. It's hard to choose a favorite because every inch of it seems fascinating. I hope I get to experience it's beauty in person instead of pictures.

http://www.italian-architecture.info/FL/FL-002.htm

Mike said...

The Reims Cathedral was built in 496 AD. Although this was not the first building on this property. before the cathedral there was church there but was burned down by a fire inh 1211 BC. The tallest part of the cathedral is the towers which are close to 267 ft. in both towers of the church there are two bells that ring on the hour and both weigh app. 11 tons. The reims cathedral was one of the first movements in gothic architecture. The detail and workmenship is why i picked this peace of art.

Zach Mays said...

Al-Masjid al-Ḥarām, located in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is the largest mosque on earth, and houses the Kaaba, the holiest place in the world for Muslims. According to Islamic tradition, a stone fell from Heaven, showing Adam and Eve, where they were to build a sacrifical altar to God. The stone itself was said to be brilliantly white, until the sins of the world turned it black. The stone disappeared after the Flood, until Abraham was guided by the Angel Gabriel to its original location, upon which, Ishmael, Abraham's son, build a new altar, The Kaaba. It is in the direction of the Kaaba, that Muslims pray five times a day, and it is every able Muslim's duty to make Hajj this place at least once in their lifetime.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Masjid-al-haram.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kaaba_mirror_edit_jj.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blackstone.JPG

kalani said...

The Chartres Cathedral (Notre Dame, has alway grabbed my attention. It was built partly built in the 1145, then reconstructed over 26 years, because of the fire that occured in 1194. Chartres Cathedral is located in Chartres, France; is also considered one of the finest examples of the Gothic style of architecture. This cathedral is so remarkable, I astonished on how defined and how muh sybolism is placed in this cathedral it is a beautiful building from its Rose windows, flying buttresses, the ceilings and the outter part on the arch of the doors the biblical stories and people portrayed on them, and how it was built for a flood of light to enter the cathedral to make it appear heaven like.

Marc Kuiper said...

The Duomo di Milano is considered one of the finest gothic cathedrals ever built. The architecture had began in the late 1300's and finished in the 1900's. The height of the naves reach 45 meters making this the highest in any completed church. The cathedral can hold up to 40,000 people and consists of mostly marble and stone. The windows are enormous and placed all around the church, flooding in light through stained glass windows (a dominate characteristic among most gothic architecture). The roof is known as a forest of spires and pinnacles resting on top the flying buttresses. The cathedrals main spire has atop if a statued figure called "madunina" which is a representation of all people that live in milan.

Austin Palmisano said...

It was during the Chola empire (1002 CE) that king Rajaraja Chola set forth to build the largest temple in India. The Brihadishwara Temple towers at a good 216ft. The Shikhara (bulbous structure) at the top of the building is of itself very large and heavy, weighing 81.25 tons. A giant statue of Nandi (sacred bull) is found at the entrance of the temple, it is carved out of a single rock measuring about 16 feet long and 13 feet high. Every piece of the structure is made out of hard granite stone which is difficult to come by in the Thanjavur area in which the temple is located. The temples testify to the brilliant achievements of the Chola in architecture, sculpture, painting and bronze casting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brihadeeswarar

sdfloyd24 said...

"Our Lady of France" also known as The Cathedral of Notre Dame is actually visited more in France than the Eiffel Tower with a staggering 13 million visitors a year. The first version was built in 528. Later as it became the "Parish Church of the Kings," Bishop Maurice De Sully deemed it unworthy and tore it to the ground. New renovations began in 1163 and ended in 1263.

When I went to Notre Dame the first thing I learned was about accustics in there. After each time you would sing a very small passage you would count to three and then continue and start all over again. It is so large and long that the sound takes longer to come back to you. All you can see it colors of light. It actually is the most majestic things Ive ever seen. We got to go through one of the portals restricted to visitors, So cool, but remember this structure was obviously built when people were a lot shorter even I had to become a Hunchback to go down the stairs.

It has Three sets of Rose windows. The south Rose is 12.9 m in diameter and has 84 panes of glass. Many of the pieces today are out of order and Viollet-De-Luc actually rotated the entire rose 15 degrees to create stability in the masonry.

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/france/paris-notre-dame.htm

Clarissa Lime said...

The Reims Cathedral is the most detailed church i have ever seen,but it wasn't the first church of its kind to be built on that site.The original church on this site was the basilica where Clovis was baptized by Saint Remi in 496 AD.Then a later cathedral was built but got burnt down in 1211.

The reims cathedral that we see today was finished by the end of the 13th century.

The cathedral contains two massive bells which can not be seen by the picture.The cathedral also has three main entrances.The main central portal which is dedicated to the Virgin. Another is the 'gallery of the kings” above has the baptism of Clovis in the center and statues of his successors.

I think the cathedral is absolutly beautiful and the most detailed peace of architecture i have ever seen.

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/france/reims-cathedral.htm

soojin brown said...

The Prophet's Mosque in Medina, Saudi Arabia stands on the site of a mosque built by the Prophet Muhammad himself (it is next to his house and contains his tomb). The Prophet's Mosque happens to be the second holiest mosque in the world. The mosque enclosure is 100 times larger than that built by the Prophet Muhammad and can hold nearly half a million worshipers. The main prayer hall occupies the entire first floor.

The mosque is lavishly decorated with polychrome marble and stones.

At the heart of the mosque is a small area called ar-Rawdah an-Nabawiyah, which extends from the tomb of the Prophet to his pulpit. All pilgrims attempt to visit and pray in ar-Rawdah, for there is a tradition that prayers uttered here are never rejected.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Masjid_Nabawi._Medina,_Saudi_Arabia.jpg

cb84 said...

Gislebertus, Last Judgement is divided into to parts. The left side the blessed arrive in heaven, and the right, the damned are seized by devils.

With the decline of the Roman Empire sculpturism was at an all time low but with the Romanesque period it then was becoming more and more popular. His influence can be traced to other French church sculpture, and his techniques helped pave the way for the Gothic style.

kaleigh said...

The Manuscript page from the Qur'an caught my attention because I thought it was so pretty with the gold boarder and black calligraphy lettering. The written lines are read from right to left and depict the message of god. It is from the 9th or 10th century from the Surat al Kahf ("The Cave").

I can just imagin how long it took for these manuscripts to be hand written so neatly and decorated with gold. The border or heading of this page is so detailed and branches out to a leaf like pattern on the end. Once calligraphy started to be used, it appeared all over the walls of palaces and on mosques.

Calligraphy is still seen today as a beautiful eligant writting.

Chynadoll17 said...

The Great Wild Goose Pagoda at Ci'en Temple is a place of worship that captured my attention. It originated during the Tang dynasty under the reign of Emperor Gaozong of Tang. It was first erected in 645 CE. It was rebuilt in 704 and the Great Wild Goose Pagoda is approximately seven stories, 5 when it was originally built. This building was built after Buddhist monk Xuan Zang returned from a 17 year pilgrimage. It is home to the 600 or so Buddhist texts that he had collected while in India. This building is very unique and I love the area surrounding it. It appears really peaceful and it's one of the most famous monuments in China. There are 1,897 pavilions, halls and monastic rooms. Many famous Chinese painters such as Yan Liben, Yuchiyi Monk, Wu Daozi, and Yin Lin, all once stayed there painting.

http://www.chinaculture.org/gb/en_travel/2003-09/24/content_34424.htm

http://www.chinatravel.com/image/attraction/xian/big-wild-goose-pagoda/big-wild-goose-pagoda7-m.jpg

Kimberly said...

The San Vitale of Raveena, Italy is a very unique building. Inside, it is practically covered in mosaics. There are several pictures and stories depicted in the mosaics of Jesus and his desciples. It is really stunning to look at and Im sure the pictures do not justify how beautiful and detailed it really is. It took around 23 years to build this church and everything from the octogonal shape of the building to the all of the detailed artwork, it is definitely a sight to see and I would love to visit it one day. Here are some pics of the inside and the mosaics.

http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/San_Vitale.html

Austin Zitch said...

Wat Phra Kaew, or the Temple of the Emerald Buddha is the most sacred Buddhist temple in Thailand. The temple is located in the center of Bangkok Thailand on the grounds of the Grand Palace. The temple began its construction shortly after the capital was moved from Thonburi to Bangkok in 1785. Unusually though, there are no living quarters for the monks in the temple, just beautifully decorated holly buildings and statues. The Buddha inside is 26 inches tall and is made of jade rather than emerald, and the alter that it rests on is made of solid gold. Although it is ususally warm in Thailand there is one strict rule for entering the temple. You must wear long pants, and if you do not have any you can actually rent trousers so you can enter the temple.

TheSlimeOnTheRadio said...

The Florence Cathedral is very unique. Although it is Gothic in style, it has many Romanesque qualities as well including its octagonal Baptistry. The interior of the building is definately Gothic with its wide, open spaces creating a sense of mystery and trancendence. The Florence Cathedral is located in Italy where its referenced as the Santa Maria del Fiore. Its construction began in 1296 by Arnolfo de Cambio and the dome was erected by Filippo Brunelleschi between 1420-1436.

Gabi said...

The Choir of Cologne Cathedral is one of Germany's most famous landmarks, and the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe. An interesting fact about the church was that it was the tallest building in the world from 1880-1884, until the completion of the Washington Monument. The construction of the Gothic church took over 600 years to complete, starting in 1248 and ending in 1880. The two towers of the church spiral 157 meters up, which is almost two football fields in length. During World War II, the building took a total of 14 aerial bomb hits, but remained intact. Many believers did claim that divine intervention was the reason why it had not collapsed, even though the city surrounding it did. I believe over 600 years worth of work on the Cathedral had something to do with it as well. Since the building is extremely old, natural erosion causes many maintenance issues. A single part of the church is always shut down due to repair. The Cathedral has twelve bells, all ranging from 3 to 11 tons in weight. The Cathedral is home to an important relic, a sarcophagus that is thought to behold the remains of the three Kings themselves. This was originally brought to the church in hopes to attract Christians from all over. The Cathedral is still an amazing tourist site to this day, attracting many visitors from all to look upon its beauty.

Picture of stain-glass window added in 2007:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/aa/Richter_window_Cologne_Cathedral.jpg

Picture of Three Kings Sarchophagus:

Zach Blizzard said...

The Byodo-in was built in the mountains of Uji close to Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. The Building is often called the Phoenix Hall. I picked this Building because of its symmetry. It amazes me how beautiful the Japanese are so artistic and sophisticated. The way the building is designed is fascinating, how it looks as if it is ascending from the ground and the way the roof has the curved lines in them is awesome. I also like the openness of its blueprints; it helps become one with the environment, and more relaxed without walls everywhere.

-Zach Blizzard

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/67/Byodoin02ps3600.jpg

Roberto said...

Binu shrines are found in the Bandiagara region of Mali, West Africa. They are one room building decorated with white marks on the façades made during agrarian rituals or rites. These rituals were for to pray for rain and the regeneration of their crops and nature in general.

These shrines also house spirits that take the form of animals to worshippers and the villagers they represent.

http://www.sacredsites.com/africa/mali/dogon.html

-Roberto Cases

vhenry said...

http://encarta.msn.com/media_461556160_761560455_-1_1/Arch_of_Constantine.html

The link above is the Arch of Constantine, and although it wasn't a place of worship, it reflects the acceptance of Christiantiy in the free world by Constantine - first Roman ruler to be a Christian and make it free to worship as one without persecution or in fear.

Completed in 315, it was created to establish his dominance over another Italian enemy, but it reflects the sign of the times in it's artwork by the oval shapes and pillars, but at the same time it shows the creation of a new era by introducing the open center inviting those to worship and worship freely which you will see with future constructs of CHRISTIAN nature.

Chelsea Griffin said...

The structure that I appreciated the most during this chapter was the Choir of Cologne Cathedral in Germany. I visited it several years ago on a trip throughout Europe, and like most things, the picture does not do it justice. The ceilings are so high with ornate carvings that you feel as though your body has stretched. The mere size of the cathedral can be overwhelming, it is one of the largest churches, the largest gothic church in northern Europe. It took over six hundred years to complete. It has survived many obstacles, including the aerial bombings during WWII. Because much of the city was flattened, the inhabitants thought it was divine intervention. I would recommend anyone who has the opportunity to visit it to do so because it truly is breath-taking.

Colin "Kamen Rider" Pritchard said...

The Notre Dame de Paris, or Our Lady of Paris Cathedral, is an example of French gothic archticture and a beautiful example of the gothic style in general. With its flying buttresses, archways, and stained glass windows to its cavernous halls that draw the eye majestically upwards to the heavens as you enter, there is a reason this is one of the most iconic, and famous, gothic cathedrals in the world. Construction began in the year 1163 or so, but the cathedral wasn't completed till 1345. Nearly 200 years of construction for a masterpiece such as this, which means the original planners lived, worked, and died without seeing it to completion. Generations were spent on this building, that it has survived the centuries since then is testament not just to their skills as builders, but also to those who respect and cherish works such as these and their endeavors to preserve and restore these places. To imagine a building taking 200 years to complete in this day and age is unthinkable, but apparently there was a sense of foresight and care for the future in those days that surpasses our own.

http://www.gotik-romanik.de/Paris,%20Kathedrale%20Notre-Dame,%20Thumbnails/Thumbnails.html

Amara Manickchand said...

The Natadera Temple is the head temple of the Shingon Sector and was established in A.D.717 by Priest Taicho. With cedar tress and camellias over few hundred years old inside this 70,000-tsubo (about 231,000 m2) area, Toshitsune Maeda, the 3rd lord of the Kaga Clan, built the incense burning pavilion, 3-story pagoda, the bell tower, the study room and rebuilt the main shrine, which was designated as one of the important cultural asset of Ishikawa Prefecture. Magnificent scenery of strangely formed rocks that are said to be the remains from ancient volcanic eruptions undersea. This temple is also famous for viewing beautiful autumn foliage.
The Temple is a perfect balance of both nature an human intervention.
In traditional Japanese/Chinese architecture the upturned eaves of the roof and colorfully painted wooden reliefs. The Temple is not the only building on the premises and also contains a dojo and a place for people to stay. The Temple and it's surroundings all convey a feeling of peace with its gardens and its harmony with nature.
http://www.natadera.com/en/garden2.html

arook said...

A mixture of native resource, and foreign invention, the spanish missions are so beautiful, in that they can seem so out of place, and perfectly fit at the same time. With seemingly simple structures made of whatever materials were local, so mundane, however they held a reverance and power, as symbols of opportunity for the native peoples to become educated. In the example I chose, one can see the lines of architecture are not particularly complex or "beautiful" , they are simple and inornate. However in an environment where structures were built strictly out of necessity, the care taken in carving the simple ornamental columns and archway express a beauty that shines through the meager gray drab of the mud and brick.

http://www.txaisi.com/MissionsChurchesBuildings/IMAG032A.JPG

Kim Fresco said...

I chose to talk about the Church of San Fransico in La Paz, Bolivia. The Iglesia de San Francisco in La Paz is notable for its intricately carved façade, one the finest examples of baroque-mestizo architecture in the Americas. Construction on the original San Francisco Church began on this site in 1548, one year before the founding of La Paz. The church later collapsed under the weight of a heavy snowfall in 1610, and was reconstructed in 1784. Blending traditional and Catholic art, San Francisco's façade contains a wealth of indigenous symbols, from masked figures to snakes, dragons, and tropical birds. Inside, the baroque influence gives way to neoclassical, with small cedar altars decorated in gold-leaf designs. You can climb to the roof for a splendid view of the top of the church and the surrounding city. Outside, an eccentric sculpture competes for attention on the Plaza de San Francisco. A mass of rock pillars and stone faces, it is intended to honor Bolivia's three great cultures: the ancient people of Tiwanaku; the Incas; and modern Bolivians.
San Francisco Church, La Paz, Bolivia


















In Bolivia, miners have traditionally “crucified” themselves as a means of protesting government policies

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/bolivia/la-paz-iglesia-de-san-francisco.htm

jason simpson said...

Jason Simpson
Intro to art Wed 7:00
I have chosen the mosque at cordoba. Cordoba was built around 784 AD during the reign of Abal Al-Rahman. The rectangular shape and the alternating red and white arches are a traditional mosque design began by the Umayyad and Abbasid mosques. My favorite part is the repeated columns and arches of the main prayer building. The rhythm of the construction gives support for a higher ceiling and allows for seamless additions in the future. The visual effect of the columns and arches stretching of into the dark corners of the hall create a mysterious space often referred to as a forest of stone.
One addition to the mosque the original builders never planed for is the gothic cathedral sprouting from the center of Cordoba. In the early 16th century the bishop proposed to tare down the mosque to build a new cathedral . Dew to public disapproval the gothic cathedral was constructed in the center instead. The differences of the two structures is obvious but you can also see the shared love of detail in both styles. I would love to visit this beautiful mosque one day.

jason simpson said...
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jason simpson said...
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jason simpson said...
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chris morffy said...

the ka'aba "cube" is a cube shaped building in mecca saudi arabia. it is considered the holiest place in islam. the five pillars of islam requires each follower to perform the "hajj" which is a sacred pilgrimage to this site at least once in their lifetime. there is a "black stone" within this building which is considered sacred and is believed to date back to adam and eve. many muslims attempt to kiss the stone, as they believe muhammad once did. islamic traditions assert that the ka'aba reflects a house located in heaven. another interesting thing is that muslims are to face "qibla," or the direction to the ka'aba from any point on earth, every day during prayer.

Kris Gusha said...

The Cologne Cathedral is one of the best known architectual monuments in Germany. The foundation stone was laid on August 15,1248 by Konrad von Hochstaden. .The most celebrated work of art in the cathedral is the Shrine of the Three Kings, a large gilded sarcophagus dating from the 13th century. The cathedral has twelve church bells, of which four are medieval.Cologne Cathedral is one of the world's largest churches, being the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe.

dpratten said...

Chartres Cathedral, 1145-1220. This structure caught my eye by having amazingly detailed architecture designs. It is located only 50 miles southwest of Paris. This is considered one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in all of France. It has two contrasting spires. One, a 349 ft. plain pyramid dating from the 1140s, and the other a 377ft. tall early 16th century Flamboyant spire on top of an older tower. In the Middle Ages, the cathedral functioned sometimes as a marketplace selling different items such as: textiles at the northern end; fuel, vegetables and meat at the southern one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chartres_1.jpg

Christian said...

La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Spain is one of the most extravagant churches I have ever seen. It was designed by Antoni Gaudi, who spent 40 yrs. working on it. He unfortunately was never able to see the building finished. To this day it is still being worked on. The place stands enormous with a total of 18 towers. Each portal into the building is decorated with sculptures from such scenes as the nativity scene and the passion.
When I saw this church in person it just blew me away how detailed the entire structure was. It was amazing.

alicia wykes said...

The Faisal mosque was completed in 1986 by a Turkish designer. Faiscal is the nation mosque of Pakistan and is one of the largest in their nation. The architect Vedat Dalokay designed the mosque so in day and/or night it could be seen for miles. This architecture really interests me because it is like no other place of worship. The floor is made of a beautiful marble and I believe the architect used this material not only for looks but for spiritual reflections well. Marble is a reflective surface like glass; so I think subconsciously they used it to say yes it's beautiful, but more importantly this is a place to praise god and reflect on yourself. The mosque can hold up to 10,000 people at a time on the inside, an additional 24,000 in a separate room and an extra 40,000 in the courtyard.

Ka$eR said...

The Cologne Cathedral is one of the best-known architectural monumnets in Germany. It is also one of the world's largest churches. Construction of the Gothic church began in 1248 and was finally finished in 1880. Over 600 years. It's really big and cool looking.

Brittany Watson said...

I enjoy looking at all of the different churches, and how much effort they would put into the churches you never see a church built today with so much time put into it. I chose the Saint Patrick's Cathedral. I have never been to New York but will be going in a few weeks and have been doing some research on what to do in New York City. And I came across this church, its absolutely stunning. The first St.Patrick's church was destroyed by a fire in 1866. It was built in 1879 with it being completely finished in 1888. They were able to accomplish this with 103 people offering $1000 donations. I hope when I go to New York City I will be able to see this gorgeous gothic structure.

maggie said...

One place of worship that I think is very interesting to me is St. Vitale because of the two mosaic facing each other, one is about Theodora the wife of Justinian and the other Justinian himself, at the mosaic of Theodora she carri a golden cup of wine and at the Justinian, on the opposite wall, he carries a bowl containing bread, together they are bringing an offering to the church for the celebration of the Eucharist.

jpeterson21 said...

The Reims Cathedralin Reims, France is a beautiful piece of gothic architexture. The gothic style shown on almost every inch of it's exterior walls grabs my attention. The more you gaze into it's west facade the more naturalistic sculptures jump out at you. The rose window on the west facade was one of the first to replace the Tympanum, which let natural light inside. This came to be signature gothic style. The rose window is beautiful but best viewed from the inside. If ever in France I would love to visit here.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Reims_Cathedral,_interior_(6).jpg

Miranda said...

Located in Chartres, about 50 miles southwest of Paris, is one of Frances finest examples of french architecture. The Cathedral itself has large rose windowns filled with stained glass and is home to "The Last Judgement" by Michealangelo. In the Middle Ages, the cathedral was sometimes used as a marketplace. Textiles were sold at the northern end, fuel, vegetables and meat were sold at the southern end. Sometimes the clergy would try to stop the life of the markets from entering into the cathedral. Wine sellers were forbidden to sell wine in the crypt, out of respect for the dead.





http://www.travel-tidbits.com/tidbits/images/fr/Chartres_Cathedral_Notre%20F.jpg

Paul Larizadeh said...

The Chennakesava Temple at Belur is the perfect example of the hoysala style of architecture. Its a worship temple that was commisioned by the Hoysala king himself to celebrate a military victory. I chose it because it is amazingly beautiful and intricate in design. it contains a shrine that was very elaborate and well designed for its time. way ahead of its time.

Paul Larizadeh said...

The Chennakesava Temple at Belur is the perfect example of the hoysala style of architecture. Its a worship temple that was commisioned by the Hoysala king himself to celebrate a military victory. I chose it because it is amazingly beautiful and intricate in design. it contains a shrine that was very elaborate and well designed for its time. way ahead of its time.

Paul Larizadeh said...

The Chennakesava Temple at Belur is the perfect example of the hoysala style of architecture. Its a worship temple that was commisioned by the Hoysala king himself to celebrate a military victory. I chose it because it is amazingly beautiful and intricate in design. it contains a shrine that was very elaborate and well designed for its time. way ahead of its time.

Amara Manickchand said...
This comment has been removed by the author.